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Pencil and ink tutorial/ WARNING! Fem.nudity in these images
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ironbadger
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Joined: 21 Jul 2002
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Location: anaheim, CA

PostPosted: Fri Sep 26, 2003 5:59 am    Post subject: Pencil and ink tutorial/ WARNING! Fem.nudity in these images Reply with quote

By its very nature, this tutorial will have to be shorter.

We now take the rough we did earlier, and go through the pencil and ink stages.

-Badger-

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60 tauren warrior of Bad Moon Rising guild.


Last edited by ironbadger on Fri Sep 26, 2003 6:10 am; edited 1 time in total
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ironbadger
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Location: anaheim, CA

PostPosted: Fri Sep 26, 2003 6:09 am    Post subject: Pencils. Reply with quote

Here is the pencil version.

Its completed pencils- I set out to do inks once I scanned this image.

You can see the rough background I chose- two columns and a wall that she stands in front of.
(Barely visible in this scan- sorry.)

The main thing is that the body has been smoothed out, and detail added.

Sorry for the nudity- I will see if I can go back in a bit and add a warning to the thread title.

You can see where I have defined the anatomy a bit more, and added jewelry and props.


The hair is kind of simple- just lines to define a mass of more or less straight hair.
Remember that hair is a large mass of single strands all going in more or less the same direction.
Hair drawing alone could eat up an entire tutorial- so I will go light on it this time out.


Its probably better for me to have you ask me questions on these and answer specific issues than ramble on- especially because I can't think of much more to add right now as far as pencil work is concerned.

-Badger-

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ironbadger
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 26, 2003 6:42 am    Post subject: Ink.... Reply with quote

Now we get to the inks part.

Please notice that main shading has not been added- that will come in the color stage, as I add it with colored pencil.

A very large secret to good inking that I was not clued in about for a good 5 or 6 years, was that inks should be as smooth as you can make them.

Try to avoid scratchy ink lines that have little loose bits sticking out at odd places.
It sounds dumb- but for years I didn't know this simple little detail, and my old inks were sloppy as a result.

Much of the techniques are hard to describe in print- but easy to show in real life.

One little bit that is important- is to try to avoid hard angles where lines meet in figure drawing.
Try to soften the point where lines come togther-
Round out the corners slightly.

Nature abhors the straight line or the hard angle.
Look at anyone whose inks you like- see how most, or all of them do things like soften say, the angle where the neck meets the head?

Look at the girl here, where her head meets the neck.
Look where her left breast curves under to meet the ribs.

See how I slightly thickened and rounded the lines there at both points?

This helps to create an appearance that the breast and head join the body naturally- that they flow into the body, and the lines thicken gradually to accept these body parts.

More advanced concepts of shading and ink effects will wait for now- the important thing is to give you the basic philosophy of inking to practice.

Summary:

Ink lines should flow smoothly, without jagged "tags" coming out at odd points.
(Be careful where two lines meet- don't carry one line over too far, and cross the other where there should be a smooth joint.)

"Break" the edges of lines where body parts meet- smooth the corners out slightly, round them out to create a feeling the parts are joining naturally.

Lines can be selectively thickened to create a feeling of greater "weight"- a sense the character has 3 dimensions.


Inking tools-
I use micron pigma disposable technical pens exclusively.


I know way too many artists who are brush ink fanatics-
Great for you, if you have hands that don't shake like mine....

I can't control a damn brush worth spit.
I've spent 12 years trying, and I still hate the damn things- so I don't brush ink.

I use tech pens, and just taper the lines, and a lot of folks assume I brush ink as a result.

It works for me.


Some people use refillable tech pens- Rapidograph is the most common-
But as far as I'm concerned, they are an expensive waste of money.

The refillable pens scratch badly- they damage the paper, and are hard to use; requiring extensive practice to get good ink flow.
Rapidographs must be cleaned frequently, are relatively fragile, and are subject to clogging.

Disposables are cheap, and easily replaced.

I use micron pigmas in the following sizes-

.08 for gross inks where i want a good, thick line.
.05 for middling lines. This is my workhorse for intermediate detail.
.03 is useful for some things- I usually have one, but it doesn't get used as much.
.01 is the smallest I bother with.
There are smaller sizes you can get- but they are onyl marginally smaller, and you won't have much real use for such tiny pen tips.
.01 is useful for say, detailing eyes.

Microns are available at nearly any art supply store, and even fabric stores often carry them as they are useful for drawing on cloth.

The ink is acid free, and archival quality- it won't yellow over time like the Itoyas or sharpies do.

DO NOT ever use sharpies for solid black inks!

Sharpie markers are available everywhere- but the ink yellows and bleeds over time- and can damage other pages of art in a sketch book because it can and will bleed onto pages in contact with the sharpie ink- even right through pages to others lying on top or under them.

I use a black marker I was clued in about some years ago.

Chartpak makes pro grade markers for drafting purposes-
Almost any large art store carries chartpak right next to prismacolor and tria markers.

I use one of their markers called "super black".

They aren't kidding- this thing covers deep and dark- and the ink dries with a finish that takes colored pencil and shows it beautifully!

I often use white colored pencil over my black inks as a result- its easier than leaving in white spaces, and the pencil shows up well in reproduction as long as I lay it down right. Very Happy


All for now-
We'll continue later with color on this pic.

Questions?

-Badger-

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Cirrel
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Joined: 29 Mar 2003
Posts: 265
Location: 400 miles north of everywhere

PostPosted: Fri Sep 26, 2003 5:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

IB wrote:
Quote:
Nature abhors the straight line or the hard angle.


Too true! This is a little something I'm working on as part of an art trade. My friend wanted his character rendered as mech-warrior type, sooo... time to bring out the big guns. Notice the difference between the 'hardware' and the character. Critters are smooth lines. Guns are hard lines and sharp angles, and consequently, they look mechanical.

So... unless you want your character to look like a robot, make 'em smooth and curvey!

This was 'inked' BTW, in the computer. Wouldn't know a tech pen from a tuba, but that's the hazards of being self taught. Yer stuck with what you know. For the newbies out there I would go with IB's suggestions for tools. The computer is OK, BUT, what you draw in it can never really be considered an 'original' for selling purrposes. So, for those of you who might want to sell some of yer stuff, go with pen on paper.

Cirrel - Just some old fur playing with his machine....
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ironbadger
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Location: anaheim, CA

PostPosted: Fri Sep 26, 2003 5:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You know, I never even thought of computer inking.

I'm an old traditonal media artist- I can't even USE photoshop... Embarassed

I always get asked about what tools I use to ink, so I just rambled on for a bit about what I prefer.

I don't knock the comp-
But as you said, you can't really sell a computer done pic as an "original".
And just about all the dedicated furry art buyers I know want an actual original they can hold in their hands...


-Badger-

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Mapper
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Joined: 21 Jun 2003
Posts: 893
Location: East coast somewhere

PostPosted: Fri Sep 26, 2003 6:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cirrel wrote:
IB wrote:
Quote:
Nature abhors the straight line or the hard angle.


Too true! This is a little something I'm working on as part of an art trade. My friend wanted his character rendered as mech-warrior type, sooo... time to bring out the big guns. Notice the difference between the 'hardware' and the character. Critters are smooth lines. Guns are hard lines and sharp angles, and consequently, they look mechanical.

So... unless you want your character to look like a robot, make 'em smooth and curvey!

This was 'inked' BTW, in the computer. Wouldn't know a tech pen from a tuba, but that's the hazards of being self taught. Yer stuck with what you know. For the newbies out there I would go with IB's suggestions for tools. The computer is OK, BUT, what you draw in it can never really be considered an 'original' for selling purrposes. So, for those of you who might want to sell some of yer stuff, go with pen on paper.

Cirrel - Just some old fur playing with his machine....


Nice!!!! keep playing with your machine youll go blind LOL

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Cirrel
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Location: 400 miles north of everywhere

PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2003 2:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mapper wrote:
Quote:
Nice!!!! keep playing with your machine youll go blind LOL


Well, I didn't go blind, but I sure got one hell of a case of "Inker's Hand'. I should mention that I do my 'inking' in the computer using a graphics pad and stylus (to heck with the mouse - that IS masochistic). That's another reason for newbies to go with IB's suggestions for tools. Graphics pads cost BIG bucks. Anyway, a graphics pad stylus is silimar to a pen cuz you hold it like one.

And apperently I'm holding it wrong cuz it HURTS! All you young cubs might not have a problem cuz younglings can take a lot of punishment, but us grayfurs can't. So let's get REAL basic here.

How do you hold a pen/pencil/brush/stylus? I do the 'between thumb, index finger, and middle finger" thing with the other two fingers curled under the palm. I also use a lot of wrist when drawing lines. Should there be more arm movement?

Lastly, should I shoot my muse? It's her fault I stayed with this project for 12 hours from start to finish. (as it was, I had to fudge the background) What is a reasonable timeframe for drawing? Is it different for inking/coloring because of the increased attention to detail?

Inquisitive minds with broken hands want to know.

Cirrel - waiting for the Ibuprofen to kick in.
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Mapper
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2003 8:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

WHOA this is a definent addition to the collection.
CGI can Never capture the soul of pen and paper or the soul of its creator. Somthing Im very envious of when i see great art. And its hard to Teach this badger new tricks this late in the game. Wink Though it gives me ideas in improving what i do. Very Happy

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ironbadger
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2003 10:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mapper wrote:
its hard to Teach this badger new tricks this late in the game. Wink Very Happy


Well, since almost 99% of what I do involves traditional art on paper, and I really only need an ability to us photoshop maybe once in an entire year's time, there really isn't a lot of incentive for me to learn it in detail. Smile

Yeah, maybe I'll get time one of these days to give it a shot...
But that would only be after I finally get my log of old commissions done and out of the way.
Frankly, I don't see it happening any time soon.

-Badger-

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RefaelBA
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Joined: 24 Oct 2003
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 26, 2003 4:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why I want a pen for my PC is that it is much easier to edit the pics on the PC. It is damn annoying to be out of room on your page or to decide you want your drawing somewhere else on it. And it would be a lot easier to fix stuff and such.
BUT I will never give up hand-coloring (it is the most fun part!)

Well manybe Cirrel can help me here Very Happy

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Cirrel
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 26, 2003 4:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don't give up the hand coloring! it IS fun. One thing I've started doing is taking the B&W line drawings done in the computer and hand coloring them. That DOES make it an original for selling purposes.

Coloring/shading in the computer is OK if you want to add some special effects or do it quickly, but the 'eye' and judgement needed for this is the same as you would use for hand coloring.

Cirrel
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RefaelBA
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 27, 2003 11:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

To tell you the truth, I think that I'm best at shading and coloring, so I don't think that doing it in the computer will be as productive. Although the outlines would be easier to do...

And as for your hands hurting as you draw, try holding it differently. Ok, you probably tried it. So, maybe try getting the pad to be a little higher/lower. Put a book under it, or find a higher chair. See if it helps Very Happy

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Kyrin
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2005 3:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What I do is sketch with a mechanical pencil, ink with the Rapidographs...my primary size is .50 mm. I use the .30 and .10 for details.

Then I scan the inked work after erasing the pencil, fiddle with cleaning up any errors or smudges with PhotoShop.

This is also my opportunity to correct sizing or position on the page.

After getting the inked work cleaned up and just right I then print it out.

Using a light table I then transfer the image to Acrylic paper with a mechanical pencil, I opten add small details like claw tips at this stage.

The acrylic paper is made by a company named Daler-Rowney and I like it much better than watercolor paper, doesn't warp as much. I can't seem to find this paper at any art supply store...not sure why, I found it in Wal-Mart of all places.

Once the image is transferred to the acrylic paper I then paint it. I also use colored pencils and the Rapidograph pens to finish the details.

Each artist does it different...I've found being able to clean it up in the computer and then transfer it to the final paper helps a lot, I don't have to sweat goof ups as much and have to start over. I just don't have the patience for that, I'd go mad. (disregard that I am already mad, please)

IB is a teacher at heart...LOL! Course I knew that, never bring up history with him, first of all he knows more than you do, and second he'll tell you everything about it, including stuff you would have never suspected. Unless of course you wanted to know...Smile That guy knows way too much stuff!

(Hugs IB, you know I love ya don't ya?)

Hmmm...since we share a birthday does that make you MY evil twin, or is it the other way around?

Kyrin
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strange-fox
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2005 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Digital art CAN be alive, it's much harder to accomplish that though. I use a mouse, but the results get pretty decent despite that, so it's all about finding the little tricks. Also, what makes a piece of art come alive is the abberiation in colors; Digital drawings are usually very stiff in choice of colors.

I always start off doing a pencil sketch, then I scan, then I make lineart. Then fills, then shading. simplicity in a lil box of chocolate.

'Nyway, all mediums have their pros and cons, you just gotta find the pros, and work your way around the cons.

This is done with a mouse in under 2-3 hours, photoshop:

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Cirrel
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice Job Strange-fox! I go pretty much the same route as you do. Pencil sketch - scan - digital magic. Only difference is that I use a graphics pad instead of a mouse. One of the biggest 'Pros' I've found with digital art is the fact that you have the 'Perfect Eraser'. You can 're-do' things easier and for me - that frees me up. I don't have to worry about mistakes.

Cirrel

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